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The Beta programming language
BETA originates from the Scandinavian school of object-orientation where the first object-oriented language Simula was developed. Object-oriented programming originated with the Simula languages developed at the Norwegian Computing Center, Oslo, in the 1960s. The BETA language development process started out in 1975 with the aim to develop concepts, constructs and tools for programming, partly based on the Simula languages. While Kristen Nygaard was professor in Aarhus, a new basic research project in object-oriented language design was started together with Bent Bruun Kristensen, Ole Lehrmann Madsen (and later also Birger Møller-Pedersen). This, and follow-up efforts have been other major components of his work since. The name of the language is BETA for complex historical, but not necessarily good reasons. The language is very powerful and built upon a few very general concepts. It is implemented on a series of computers. BETA is used for formidable business tasks as well as in academic education and research. It was also the platform for Nygaard’s research in extending object-oriented programming by new basic language constructs. BETA is a modern object-oriented language with comprehensive facilities for procedural and functional programming. It has powerful abstraction mechanisms that provide excellent support for design and implementation, including data definition for persistent data. The abstraction mechanisms include support for identification of objects, classification, and composition. BETA is a strongly typed language (like Simula, Eiffel, and C++), with most type checking being carried out at compile-time. The abstraction mechanisms include class, procedure, function, coroutine, process, exception, and many more, all unified into the ultimate abstraction mechanism: the pattern. In addition to the pattern, BETA has subpattern, virtual pattern, and pattern variable. BETA does not only allow for passive objects as in Smalltalk, C++, and Eiffel. BETA objects may also act as coroutines, making it possible to model alternating sequential processes and quasi-parallel processes. BETA coroutines may also be executed concurrently with supported facilities for synchronization and communication, including monitors and rendezvous communication. [Source:http://heim.ifi.uio.no/~kristen/]
 

 

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